Vegetative propagation of fungi carries out by mycelium rupture into segments, each of which is capable of independent existence. Budding in yeast is

Vegetative propagation in fungi [reproduction]

Vegetative propagation of fungi carries out by mycelium rupture into segments, each of which is capable of independent existence. Budding in yeast is also an example of vegetative propagation.

In many fungi occur special outgrowths — chlamydospores and oidia.

Chlamydospores

Chlamydospores are a mycelium cells increased in size and wearing a thick membrane, impregnated with different dyes. They serve to survive in adverse conditions (for example, winter) (diagram 262, 1).

During the formation of chlamydospores, individual cells of mycelium overflow with nutrients due to the neighboring cells, which then die and thus the mycelium breaks up into a series of chlamydospores.

Oidia

Oidia form as a result of mycelium disintegration into its constituent cells. Each of the cells then gives rise to a new mycelium (diagram 262, 2). Taken from http://worldofschool.org

Diagram 262. The types of spores in fungi: 1 — chlamydospores; 2 — oidia; 3 — zoosporangia in Saprolegnia; 4 — the young sporangia of Mucor: c — column; 5 — mature, penetrated sporangia of Mucor. 6 — conidiophore with conidia in Penicillium

Mycelial cords (rhizomorphs) and sclerotia

Mycelial cord (rhizomorph) can also be used for vegetative propagation, as well as sclerotia. In one mycelium form several (sometimes many) sclerotia, each of which, germinating after overwintering of seedling, gives rise to several individuals.