Reproduction of fungi often happens due to production of special spores . By origin distinguish endogenous (internal) and exogenous (external) spores

Spore production in fungi [Formation, Sporulation]

Reproduction of fungi often happens due to production of special spores. By origin distinguish endogenous (internal) and exogenous (external) spores.

Endogenous spores

Lower fungi have only endogenous spores. They arise in sporangia that resemble sporangia of algae. In water fungi (for example, Saprolegnia, diagram 262, 3) form mobile zoospores, in others — spores that are deprived of mobility (for example, Mucor, diagram 262, 4-5). Sporangia usually develop on specific mycelial threads called Sporangiophores.

Exogenous spores

Exogenous spores are called conidia. They are found mainly in the higher fungi, which are already the inhabitants of the land. Conidia arise on specific mycelial threads — conidiophores and gradually, one by one, from the filament detach of the thread’s top. Conidia are usually wrapped in shells (diagram 262, 6). Taken from http://worldofschool.org

Diagram 262. The types of fungi spores: 1 — chlamydospores; 2 — oidiums; 3 — zoosporangia in Saprolegnia; 4 — the young sporangia of Mucor: c — column; 5 — mature, penetrated sporangia of Mucor; 6 — conidiophores with conidia in Penicillium

Forms of conidia are extremely diverse and often so characteristic that the fungus is recognized once by them.

The same fungus can produce several types of conidia. In Rusts, for example, four of five forms of sporification are conidial by their origin (they are named with specific names).

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