Plant systematics , like other botanical disciplines, originated from the practical needs of human life. First human cognition of the plants belongs

Plant systematics history [classification, taxonomy]

Plant systematics, like other botanical disciplines, originated from the practical needs of human life.

First human cognition of the plants belongs to prehistoric times. Collecting seeds, fruits, tubers, bulbs, human marked useful, avoided harmful. From ancient times, plants used to treat various diseases.

With the advent of agriculture appeared the plants culture. This led to a deeper understanding of the structure of plants, their biology. Gradually the range of farmed plants increased.

With the accumulation of knowledge there was a need to understand the diversity of plants. The first attempt to give a classification of the plant belongs to the Greek scientist Theophrastus (370-285 BC). He gave descriptions of 500 plants and divided them into trees, shrubs and herbs. In each of these groups, he distinguished between deciduous and evergreen, cultural and wild, flowering plants and non-flowering.

In the work by Pliny the Elder (ancient Rome — 79 BC) was described 1000 species of plants, among which a special attention is given to medicinal plants, fruit, especially grapes.

In the first agronomic work written by the Roman author Columella in I century AD, was described the different grape varieties and methods of vaccination.

The Middle Ages, when science and education were completely subordinated to the church with its superstitions and persecutions, gave not much to the development of botany.

In the XVI century, during the Renaissance, rudiments of broad generalizations appear in botany. Appear systems of plants that distinguish them for a certain set of symptoms, and even the beginnings of a natural system of plants. In this regard, much work was done by Cesalpino (1519-1603), who built a system based on the structure of the fruit. Although his system was inherently artificial, he has allocated such natural groups of plants like Fabaceae, Apiaceae, and Asteraceae. Taken from http://worldofschool.org

In the XVI-XVII centuries, expeditions, equipped for visiting the newly discovered countries (America, India, Australia and so on) took out of there large herbarium, and botanists horizons immeasurably widened.

Descriptions of the newly discovered plants were gradually improving, and for the convenience of managing, the plants were grouped in systems — artificial and very different in different botanists, according to the basis of which each supposed the basis for the system is.