Plants around us are extremely diverse. There are no two plants in nature, completely similar to each other. They will have at least slight differenc

Objectives, problems and tasks of plant systematics [taxonomy, classification]

Plants around us are extremely diverse. There are no two plants in nature, completely similar to each other. They will have at least slight differences in shape, size of leaves, roots, type of pubescence, etc. Trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants are plants that form seeds and fruits, spore-plants — ferns, mosses, fungi, algae and so forth — are presented by a large number of shapes that are different from each other.

The first objective for flora researchers was to understand the chaos of plant forms, to create a classification of the plant world, so it could be divided into groups, easily manageable and accessible to compare. Creating a classification of plants was the main task of plant systematics. Initially, the taxonomy was limited with this aim. As a result of this work has been carried out more or less complete inventory, registration of plant forms. After that it became possible to expand the systematics problems. There was a necessity to construct a classification that would not only be made manageable whole diversity of plant forms, but also reflected the relationships between different groups of plants. Taken from http://worldofschool.org

Finally, with the expansion of scientific knowledge, and the development of philosophical ideas of humanity, plant systematics faced with the objective — reflect in classification the development sequence of plants — the evolution of the flora, its phylogeny. The latter problem faced systematics in the second half of XIX century, after the appearance of Darwin's theory on the origin of species.