De Jussieu Natural systems of plant classification period begins with the publication in 1789 (the year of the French Revolution) of natural system b

Natural systems of plant classification

De Jussieu

Natural systems of plant classification period begins with the publication in 1789 (the year of the French Revolution) of natural system by French botanist De Jussieu (1748-1836).

This system divided plants world into 3 sections:

  • non-cotyledon — all Thallophyta and Embryophyta up to ferns, including them;
  • monocotyledons;
  • dicotyledons.

Lamarck

A significant role in creating natural systems is played by Lamarck (1744-1829). Even in his “Philosophy of Zoology” (1809), he strongly emphasized the insufficiency of organic forms separation into classes, orders, and so on.

Lamarck acceded to the natural system of Jussieu — it probably had an influence on the formation of his evolutionary ideas.

Great merit of Lamarck is an introduction to the systematics of a dichotomous definition of the principle of plants, which we commonly use to nowadays.

Lamarck and Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire shattered the dogma of the constancy of species in the first half of the XIX century. With the accumulation of material, with the development of science of embryology, paleontology is being prepared phylogenetic systems, i.e. systems, reflecting the sequence of the plant world development. Taken from http://worldofschool.org

Engels

The great founders of Greek philosophy created the concept, according to which “the whole of nature, from the smallest particles of it to the greatest organisms, ranging from particle and ending with the sun, from the Protista to human, is in the eternal process of origin and destruction, in a continuous flow, in relentless motion and change. With the only significant difference is that the Greeks had this idea as result of genius conjecture, and we have it as a result of strictly scientific research, based on experience, and therefore it has a much more definite and clear form” (Engels, Dialectics of Nature, 1955, p. 11).